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Biometric Privacy Compliance Tips Case Law Developments Legislative Developments & Trends

Current BIPA Trends: Class Actions Targeting the Use of Voice Data

David J. Oberly |

2021 has brought with it a sizeable expansion in the types of technology and companies that are now being targeted with bet-the-company Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”) class action lawsuits. The first major expansion involved the targeting of virtual try-on technology, a feature made even more popular during the COVID-19 pandemic, which, according to plaintiffs, utilizes facial recognition technology. More recently, a high volume of BIPA class action suits have been filed targeting the use of voice-powered technologies.

BIPA & Voice Data

BIPA regulates the collection, use, and storage of “biometric identifiers,” which includes—among other things—“voiceprints.” However, the term “voiceprint” is not defined in Illinois’ biometric privacy statute. “Voiceprint” is generally defined as a distinctive pattern of curved lines and whorls made by a machine that measures human vocal sounds for the purpose of identifying an individual speaker. It is this hallmark of identifying (or verifying the identity of) an individual that makes voice data a “voiceprint” under BIPA. In this respect, courts have noted that voice biometrics, also known as voiceprinting, is the use of biological characteristics—one’s voice—to verify an individual’s identity.

Thus, a critical distinction exists between general voice data, which is not covered by BIPA, and voiceprint, which fall under the scope of Illinois’ biometric privacy statute—with the important dividing line being the identifying quality of the biometric information. In a 2017 case, an Illinois federal court recognized this distinction, noting the difference between the mere capture of voice data and an actual “voiceprint.” In doing so, the court noted that if an entity simply captures a person’s voice without generating a voiceprint for the specific purpose of identifying ,or verifying the identity of, an individual, then there is no violation of BIPA.

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Case Law Developments Class Action Litigation Defense Strategies

Designing a BIPA Defense: Biometric Manufacturer & Vendor Litigation Strategies

Amanda M. Noonan |

Class action litigation against biometric technology manufacturers and vendors is on the rise. Several courts have recognized the viability of such claims and held manufacturers/vendors may be subject to liability under Sections 15(b) and 15(d) of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”). 740 ILCS 14/15(b) & (d); Figueroa v. Kronos Inc., 454 F. Supp. 3d 772, 784-86 (N.D. Ill. 2020). The merits of these BIPA claims are yet undetermined. But the risk of having to defend such claims in state and federal courts is real and ongoing.

As the saying goes, the best defense is good offense. Rather than face uncertain liability, or incur exorbitant litigation defense costs, potential BIPA defendants often turn to arbitration provisions. For manufacturers/vendors of biometric technology, however, this approach may not be that simple.

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Case Law Developments

Illinois Appellate Court Clarifies Applicable Limitations Period in BIPA Class Action Litigation

David J. Oberly |

On September 17, 2021, the Illinois Appellate Court First District delivered its much-anticipated decision in Tims v. Black Horse Carriers, Inc., 2021 IL App (1st) 200563 (1st Dist. Sep. 17, 2021), addressing the applicable statute of limitations for causes of action asserted under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”).

The court held that claims brought under Sections 15(a), (b), and (e)—pertaining to the law’s privacy policy/data destruction, notice/consent, and data security requirements—are subject to a five-year statute of limitations. Conversely, claims asserted under Sections 15(c) and (d)—relating to the law’s ban on profiting from biometric data and disclosure limitations—are subject to a one-year limitations period.

Importantly, in finding that BIPA’s two most commonly asserted provisions, Sections 15(a) and (b), are subject to the longer five-year limitations period, the opinion ensures that the tsunami of class action BIPA filings will continue to flood the courts for the foreseeable future.